DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Courses Taught at Stony Brook (selection)

 

Department of English

 

EGL608 Translation Theory and Practice

This module explores how translation has been conceived throughout history and it focuses on how translation practices impact and relate to theory. Students will develop a good knowledge and practice of different types of translation – including interlingual, intralingual, and intersemiotic translation –, and grasp the ethical dilemmas that translating entails. 


EGL303 Science Fiction: Representing the "Other"

The goal of this course is to explore science fiction literature and cinema, and how this genre has constructed varying representations of sameness and otherness. It considers the representation of the “Other” in a number of movies and texts written by authors such as Herbert George Wells, James Graham Ballard, Richard Matheson and Phillis Dorothy James. The course shows the transnational development throughout history of the genre and its intersection with other genre conventions, including fantasy, horror, documentary, noir and road movies.

 

EGL301 Representing Migrants
This is a course designed for English majors, with an emphasis on developing the skills necessary to research a topic, create and deliver effective oral presentations, and write a substantial analytic essay incorporating multiple secondary sources. It focuses on the representation of migrants in film and literature, considering a number of texts written by authors such as Pietro di Donato, Shirin Ramzanali Fazel, Giuseppe Catozzella, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Amara Lakhous. Topics of analysis include translation and cultural mobility, the self-representation of minority cultures and identities, the construction of national and transnational belongings, and the connection between narration and power.

 

EGL333 The Italian American Experience in Literature

This module explores the literary representation of the Italian migration to the United States, with a particular emphasis on cultural displacement, translation and cultural mobility, and the self-representation of minority cultures and identities. Moreover, they will acquire familiarity with a number of texts written by authors such as Mark Twain, Leonardo Sciascia, John Fante, Pietro di Donato, Tennessee Willliams and Kym Ragusa. Topics of analysis of these texts – which include both canonical and non-canonical literature –  include cultural displacement, the construction of national and transnational identities, and the connection between narration and power.

 

EGL194 Introduction to Film Studies

This module offers an introduction to film, including a basic familiarity with the terminology of film production and with techniques of film analysis. The course emphasizes critical viewing and writing, with attention to cinematography, editing, sound, narrative, authorship, genre and ideology. The course also offers an introduction to multiple cinematic traditions from across the globe.

 

EGL376 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature 

This module focuses on literature that depicts the British and the Italian colonial expansions and their legacies. On completing the module, students will have a good knowledge of key issues in post-colonial theory and how these themes are reflected in literature. Moreover, they will acquire familiarity with a number of texts written by authors such as  Herbert George Wells, Joseph Conrad, China Achebe, Ennio Flaiano, Shirin Ramzanali Fazel, and Cristina Ali Farah.  Topics of analysis of these texts – which include both canonical and non-canonical literature –  include cultural displacement, the construction of national identity, and the connection between narration and power.

 

EGL121 Global Film Traditions 

An introductory film course with a focus on the cross-cultural study of film from multiple world traditions. Students will learn the basics of film analysis and terminology. They will also develop a familiarity with films made in diverse national contexts, including, but not limited to, parts of Europe, Ethiopia and other parts of Africa, South Asia, Iran, China, Japan, North America, and elsewhere.

 

Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature

 

CLT/CST 680: Research Seminar

This course aims to explore from both a practical and theoretical point of view the articulation of research in Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. Approaches to the writing of dissertation prospectuses, paper abstracts, journal articles, grants and fellowship proposals, and presentations for professional conferences are presented, analyzed, and put into practice. This course satisfies core requirements for the both Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies Ph.D. programs.

 

CCS393: European Cinema and Cultural Studies 

 

CCS 202: Film Genres: Crime and Science Fiction

The goal of this course is to explore the concept of film genre along with the conventions of crime and science fiction movies. The course shows the historical development of these genres and their intersection with other genre conventions, including fantasy, horror, mockumentary, noir, and road movies. A particular attention is given to the representation of two iconic outcast characters: gangsters and aliens. 

 

HON401: Italy and the Horn of Africa

This course aims at improving the students’ knowledge on the subject of colonialism, immigration and the colonial and diasporic histories of Somalia, Eritrea and Ethiopia, emphasising the transnational dimension of contemporary cultures

 

Department of European Languages, Literatures and Cultures

 

HUI 236: The Italian-American Scene 

Looking closely at historical documents, movies, and literature, the module traces some major themes of Italian-American culture such as regional and national identities, belonging, landscape, gender relations, religion, changing social structures, and political commitment. 


HUI 231: Sex and Politics in Italian Cinema 

The cinematic representation of gender, class, and sexual politics in post-World War II Italian films and the relationship of these themes to Italian history, society, and culture are discussed. Readings include selected works of film history, criticism, and theory.

 

Previous Teaching Experience (selection)

Postgraduate

 

2011 – 2013 IT905 Emigrants, Migrants, Immigrants (University of Warwick, course convenor)

This masterʼs course aims to familiarize students with narratives in Italian associated with the experience of migration and cultural displacement, from the unification of Italy to the present.

 

Undergraduate

 

2012 – 2013 IT113 Forms and Fashions in Italian Intellectual Culture (University of
Warwick, reading group tutor on Calvino, Leopardi, and Machiavelli)

This module introduces first-year students to major forms, genres, stylistic questions and movements in Italian literary and cultural history.

 

2009 – 2011 IT411 L'Italia nel '900 (University of Warwick, course convenor)

This course for final-year students focuses on a number of crucial issues relating to contemporary Italian society and culture, such as migration, minoritiesʼ rights, urbanisation, and colonialism.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.